Top 5 Plant-based Protein: So This Is Where Vegans Get Their Protein!

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Protein has been a misunderstood component of the human diet for many years — especially since the vegetarian, vegan, and raw food movements took hold. Many vegetarians resent the question “But where do you get your protein?” and often remark that it’s the overweight and unhealthy that ask this question, but the reality is, is that humans do need protein, and each human’s body needs a different amount based on their genetics and lifestyle. Some people do remarkably well with higher amounts of protein in their diets while others fare much better with little protein. One does not need to consume animal protein however to fulfill their needs, and also does not have too subsist on tofu and faux-meat products at every meal either. Here are the top 5 plant proteins that move swiftly and easily through the body while proving to be satisfying and tasty.

5 Broccoli

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Everyone loves steamed broccoli, so add whatever sauces or dips to these delicious bite-sized morsels to add a little flavor and fun. Broccoli has 5.7 grams of protein in only1 cup so it’s easy to get your fill simply by adding it to salads, stir-fries, or casseroles. It’s also high in vitamin K, C and A, folate, manganese and fiber so load up!

4 Spinach

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Spinach is high in protein (1g per cup), making it easy to get a good amount in a salad, tossing a bunch in a smoothie (it doesn’t add a bitter taste) or stir-fried with other vegetables in coconut oil and tamari or shoyu. It reduces to a fraction of the size when cooked so get lots of it! It’s also high in vitamin A, K, B2, C, E, B1, magnesium, folate, manganese, iron, tryptophan, calcium, potassium, fiber, copper, phosphorus, zinc, and choline, so the more the better.

3 Almonds

Almonds are not only high in protein (8g per 1/4 cup) – they are the only alkaline nut currently known, they are also high in manganese, vitamin E, magnesium, tryptophan, copper, and phosphorus. Excellent in both sweet and salty dishes, almonds are versatile and can be eaten in many ways – raw, toasted, seasoned, sliced, ground or as almond butter. Sprinkle them on your vegetables for a crunch, add them to cereal, spread almond butter on sprouted grain bread with jam or preserves or make a dip with it for guests.

2 Pumpkin Seeds

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Pumpkin seeds are an excellent addition to the diet and high in protein (8g per 1/4 cup) as well as manganese, tryptophan, magnesium, phosphorus and copper. Soaking shelled pumpkin seeds in water for 1 to 2 hours and then blending them with ginger, garlic, tamari and any herbs and spices that you like can create a delicious, nutritious pate to go with sliced bell pepper, broccoli, cauliflower, celery, and/or baby carrots.

1 Quinoa

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Quinoa happens to not only be high in protein, but has a complete protein profile, meaning it contains all amino acids necessary for the body. Quinoa is an alkaline grain that tastes delicious, cooks quickly, and pairs well with almost anything – on salads, with meats or even as a breakfast dish with almond milk and honey. Quinoa is a fairly new seed grain in the American food system, being from the highlands of Peru originally, and gaining popularity due to its vast nutritional profile and ability to be eaten in such a variety of ways.

So there you have it – 5 high-protein non-animal foods that won’t constipate, clog you up, or damage your kidneys. Other higher protein foods are leafy greens and legumes, so stock up on these for healthy, muscle-building protein.

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